VOA英语学习网 > 科学美国人 > 2019年科学美国人 > 科学美国人60秒科学系列 >
缩小放大

科学美国人60秒:适应环境才是王道

[提示:]双击单词,即可查看词义!如果生词较多,请先学习:VOA慢速英语1500基础词汇
中英对照 听力原文

Heat Changes Insect Call, but It Still Works

昆虫的叫声会随温度而变化

Insects can be noisy. But most of the sounds they produce, we can’t hear. Take tiny insects called treehoppers. They communicate by producing vibrations. When a male treehopper is hunting for a mate, he vibrates his body to produce a special love song.

昆虫非常吵。但是它们发出的大多数声音,我们听不见。以一种叫树跳虫的小昆虫为例。它们通过振动进行交流。当一只雄性树袋熊在寻找配偶时,它会摆动身体发出一首特别的情歌。

“They sound like oooo-boo-boo-boop.”

“声音听起来像呜呜-呜呜-呜呜。”

Kasey Fowler-Finn is an assistant professor of biology at Saint Louis University. She says if a female treehopper is interested, she’ll vibrate back to the male. Basically, her way of saying, “Hey, there.”

凯西·福勒-芬恩是圣路易斯大学生物学助理教授。她说,如果雌树袋熊感兴趣,她会回到雄树袋熊那里。用自己的方式表达,“嘿,看那里。”

\

Fowler-Finn wondered if treehopper mating songs might change at different temperatures, which could affect whether the species survives as the climate changes. So she and graduate student Dowen Jocson built custom incubators, using plywood and Ikea shelves—plus, a laser that helps them listen to treehoppers.

福尔勒-芬恩想知道,在不同的温度下,角蝉的求偶歌声是否会发生变化,这可能会影响到这个物种是否会随着气候的变化而生存下来。于是,她和研究生道恩·乔森(Dowen Jocson)用胶合板和宜家的置物架(shelvesplus)——一种可以帮助他们倾听树木角蝉声音的激光——建造了定制的孵化器。

“The laser receives information about these tiny vibrations on the plant stem, which we then amplify and process into sounds that we can hear.”

“激光接收关于植物茎上这些微小振动的信息,然后我们将其放大并加工成我们能听到的声音。

Turns out, the treehoppers do sound different when the temperature changes. Here’s a male singing at 65 degrees.

事实证明,当温度变化时,角蝉的声音确实不同。这是一只雄性在65华氏度的温度下唱歌。

[CLIP: Insect sound]

And another at 97 degrees.

另一个是在97华氏度的歌声。

[CLIP: Second insect sound]

But that’s not all. The team recorded these songs and played them for females to see if they still found them attractive.

但这还不是全部。研究小组将这些歌曲录制下来,并播放给雌性角蝉听,看看她们是否仍然觉得这些歌曲有吸引力。

“So essentially, we’re having a conversation with the insect, because we can play back a bunch of different signals to females and ask her how much she likes each one.”

“所以,本质上,我们是在和昆虫对话,因为我们可以向雌性回放一系列不同的信号,并问她有多喜欢。”

As male treehopper love songs changed across temperatures, females still recognized them—saying, “Yep, I’m interested in mating with you.” Jocson says that was exciting.

当雄性角蝉的情歌随着温度的变化而变化时,雌性仍然能认出它们——说:“是的,我有兴趣和你交配。”乔森说,这很令人兴奋。

“I think when we saw that, we were just like, ‘Wow, this is awesome.’”

我想,当我们看到它的时候,我们会说,‘哇,这太棒了。’”

The study is in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology.

这项研究发表在《进化生物学杂志》上。

She says this just one piece of the puzzle. But it gives her some hope that treehoppers and other similar insect species will keep things steamy—even as the climate warms.

福尔勒-芬恩说这只是一部分。但这给了她一些希望,即使气候变暖,角蝉和其他类似的昆虫物种也会保持活跃。

Heat Changes Insect Call, but It Still Works

Insects can be noisy. But most of the sounds they produce, we can’t hear. Take tiny insects called treehoppers. They communicate by producing vibrations. When a male treehopper is hunting for a mate, he vibrates his body to produce a special love song.

“They sound like oooo-boo-boo-boop.”

Kasey Fowler-Finn is an assistant professor of biology at Saint Louis University. She says if a female treehopper is interested, she’ll vibrate back to the male. Basically, her way of saying, “Hey, there.”

Fowler-Finn wondered if treehopper mating songs might change at different temperatures, which could affect whether the species survives as the climate changes. So she and graduate student Dowen Jocson built custom incubators, using plywood and Ikea shelves—plus, a laser that helps them listen to treehoppers.

“The laser receives information about these tiny vibrations on the plant stem, which we then amplify and process into sounds that we can hear.”

Turns out, the treehoppers do sound different when the temperature changes. Here’s a male singing at 65 degrees.

[CLIP: Insect sound]

And another at 97 degrees.

[CLIP: Second insect sound]

But that’s not all. The team recorded these songs and played them for females to see if they still found them attractive.

“So essentially, we’re having a conversation with the insect, because we can play back a bunch of different signals to females and ask her how much she likes each one.”

As male treehopper love songs changed across temperatures, females still recognized them—saying, “Yep, I’m interested in mating with you.” Jocson says that was exciting.

“I think when we saw that, we were just like, ‘Wow, this is awesome.’”

The study is in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology. [Dowen Mae I. Jocson et al, Temperature coupling of mate attraction signals and female mate preferences in four populations of Enchenopa treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae)]

She says this just one piece of the puzzle. But it gives her some hope that treehoppers and other similar insect species will keep things steamy—even as the climate warms.


内容来自 VOA英语学习网https://www.chinavoa.com/show-8762-241841-1.html
Related Articles
内容推荐