VOA英语学习网 > 科学美国人 > 2019年科学美国人 > 科学美国人60秒科学系列 >
缩小放大

科学美国人60秒: 科学家鼓励其他女科学家表达自己的意见

[提示:]双击单词,即可查看词义!如果生词较多,请先学习:VOA慢速英语1500基础词汇
中英对照 听力原文

Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

科学家鼓励其他女科学家表达自己的意见

If you attend science conferences, ever pay attention to who in the audience asks questions? Geneticist Natalie Telis did. And she noticed something… off. "For the entire first day of the conference, I was the only woman to ask a question. And I thought, wow, that's kind of weird, right?"

如果你参加科学会议,有没有注意过听众中谁在提问?遗传学家娜塔莉·泰利斯就是这样做的。她注意到…“在会议的第一天,我是唯一一个提问的女性。我想,哇,这有点奇怪,对吧?”

So, being a scientist, she decided to systematically study who asks questions at scientific conferences. Together with colleagues from Stanford University, where she was based at the time, and Emory University in Atlanta, she recorded more than 2000 questions, from hundreds of talks, at eight different scientific conferences.

因此,作为一名科学家,她决定系统地研究在科学会议上提问的人。她与当时所在的斯坦福大学和亚特兰大埃默里大学的同事一起,在8个不同的科学会议上,记录了来自数百场演讲的2000多个问题。

After assigning either male or female designations to question askers—which the researchers acknowledge in the paper doesn't fully capture the spectrum of gender identity—they found that women ask far fewer questions than an representative result based on their numbers. In fact: "You need 85-90 percent of your room to be women before 50 percent of your questions come from women."

研究人员在论文中承认,无论是男性还是女性的提问者,都没有完全捕捉到性别认同的光谱。事实上:“在50%的问题来自女性之前,你需要85% - 90%的房间都是女性。”

But Telis did identify a possible solution. Halfway through the Biology of Genomes conference in 2015, Telis started tweeting some of her preliminary findings, about how few women had been asking questions, compared to their relative numbers at the meeting. That information sparked a public discussion—and a policy change from the conference organizers, who instituted a rule that the first question at every talk had to come from a scientist still working towards her PhD. In the hope that the approach would produce a more diverse set of question askers. And it worked.

但泰利斯确实找到了一个可能的解决方案。2015年基因组生物学大会进行到一半时,泰利斯开始在twitter上发布她的一些初步发现,与会上的相对人数相比,女性提问的人数是多么的少。这一信息引发了公众的讨论,会议组织者也做出了政策上的改变,他们制定了一条规则,即每次演讲的第一个问题必须来自一位仍在攻读博士学位的科学家。希望这种方法能产生一组更加多样化的问题发问者。它工作。

"Before our intervention, about 11 percent of questions came from women. Which is one third of what you'd expect. After the intervention, you get more like 35 percent of questions coming from women. It's actually what you'd expect from that audience." The analysis is in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Telis says that strategy—of simply publicizing the problem—has been effective at other conferences too. Getting more women to not only attend, but to participate, in scientific conferences.

“在我们进行干预之前,大约11%的问题来自女性。这是你期望的三分之一。在干预之后,你会发现35%的问题来自女性。这实际上是你对观众的期望。”这项分析发表在《美国人类遗传学杂志》上。泰利斯说,简单地宣传这个问题的策略在其他会议上也很有效。让更多的女性不仅参加,而且参与科学会议。

"A lot of women have messaged me and said, 'Oh, you know I asked my first question at a conference when I saw this work,' or stuff like that. And I hope that means people are taking advantage of that incredible opportunity to really add their voice, not just their face in the conference photo, to that scientific community."

“很多女性给我发信息说,‘哦,你知道,当我看到这个作品时,我在一个会议上问了我的第一个问题,’或者诸如此类的话。我希望这意味着人们正在利用这个不可思议的机会,真正为科学界增加他们的声音,而不仅仅是他们在会议照片中的面孔。”

Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

If you attend science conferences, ever pay attention to who in the audience asks questions? Geneticist Natalie Telis did. And she noticed something… off. "For the entire first day of the conference, I was the only woman to ask a question. And I thought, wow, that's kind of weird, right?"

So, being a scientist, she decided to systematically study who asks questions at scientific conferences. Together with colleagues from Stanford University, where she was based at the time, and Emory University in Atlanta, she recorded more than 2000 questions, from hundreds of talks, at eight different scientific conferences.

After assigning either male or female designations to question askers—which the researchers acknowledge in the paper doesn't fully capture the spectrum of gender identity—they found that women ask far fewer questions than an representative result based on their numbers. In fact: "You need 85-90 percent of your room to be women before 50 percent of your questions come from women."

But Telis did identify a possible solution. Halfway through the Biology of Genomes conference in 2015, Telis started tweeting some of her preliminary findings, about how few women had been asking questions, compared to their relative numbers at the meeting. That information sparked a public discussion—and a policy change from the conference organizers, who instituted a rule that the first question at every talk had to come from a scientist still working towards her PhD. In the hope that the approach would produce a more diverse set of question askers. And it worked.

"Before our intervention, about 11 percent of questions came from women. Which is one third of what you'd expect. After the intervention, you get more like 35 percent of questions coming from women. It's actually what you'd expect from that audience." The analysis is in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Telis says that strategy—of simply publicizing the problem—has been effective at other conferences too. Getting more women to not only attend, but to participate, in scientific conferences.

"A lot of women have messaged me and said, 'Oh, you know I asked my first question at a conference when I saw this work,' or stuff like that. And I hope that means people are taking advantage of that incredible opportunity to really add their voice, not just their face in the conference photo, to that scientific community."


内容来自 VOA英语学习网https://www.chinavoa.com/show-8762-241769-1.html
Related Articles
内容推荐