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科学美国人60秒: 一个用于形容今天的词

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一个用于形容今天的词

Iktsuarpok. If you’ve ever called in a pizza order and then stepped out the door a couple of times to see if the delivery guy was there yet, well, you’ve experienced iktsuarpok. It’s an Inuit word that “refers to the anticipation one feels when waiting for someone, whereby one keeps going outside to check if they have arrived.” That’s what University of East London psychologist Tim Lomas wrote in 2016 in the Journal of Positive Psychology.

如果你曾经点披萨,肯定出去几次,看看送披萨的人是否来了,那么,你一定经历过iktsuarpok。这是一个因纽特语单词,“指的是一个人在等待某人时所感受到的期待,在这种期待中,一个人会不断地到外面去看看他们是否已经到了。”这是东伦敦大学的心理学家蒂姆·洛马斯(Tim Lomas) 2016年在《积极心理学杂志》上写的。

Iktsuarpok was just one entry in his paper, titled “Towards a Positive Cross-Cultural Lexicography: Enriching Our Emotional Landscape through 216 ‘Untranslatable’ Words Pertaining to Well-Being.” Untranslatable as single words in English, that is.

Iktsuarpok只是他论文中的一篇,题目是“走向积极的跨文化词典编纂:通过216个与幸福相关的‘不可翻译’词汇丰富我们的情感图景”。“也就是说,这些词不能在英语中不能翻译成单个单词。

Other examples include the Georgian word shemomedjamo, meaning to be full but to keep eating because the food is so good; Bantu’s mbuki-mvuki: whipping off your clothes to dance; and Waldeinsamkeit—that’s a German word for the mysterious, and possibly slightly creepy, solitude you may feel when you’re in the woods by yourself.

其他的例子包括乔治亚语的shemomedjamo,意思是吃饱了,但是人们继续吃,因为食物很好吃;班图的mbuki-mvuki:脱掉衣服跳舞;waldeinsamkeit是一个德语单词,意思是当你独自一人在树林里时,可能会感到一种神秘的,甚至有点令人毛骨悚然的孤独。

Early this morning, Lomas tweeted another such single word that covers a lot of meaning: Jayus. It’s Indonesian. And it means “a joke so unfunny (or told so badly) that you just have to laugh.” Why did he tweet that today? Check the calendar. And be filled with melancholy and world-weariness. You know. Weltschmertz.

今天早上,洛马斯在推特上发布了另一个含义丰富的单词:Jayus。这是印尼语。它的意思是“一个笑话很无趣(或者讲得很糟糕),但你不得不笑。”“他今天为什么发那条推特?”看看日历。原来是充满忧郁和厌世。你知道的。Weltschmertz。

Iktsuarpok. If you’ve ever called in a pizza order and then stepped out the door a couple of times to see if the delivery guy was there yet, well, you’ve experienced iktsuarpok. It’s an Inuit word that “refers to the anticipation one feels when waiting for someone, whereby one keeps going outside to check if they have arrived.” That’s what University of East London psychologist Tim Lomas wrote in 2016 in the Journal of Positive Psychology.

Iktsuarpok was just one entry in his paper, titled “Towards a Positive Cross-Cultural Lexicography: Enriching Our Emotional Landscape through 216 ‘Untranslatable’ Words Pertaining to Well-Being.” Untranslatable as single words in English, that is.

Other examples include the Georgian word shemomedjamo, meaning to be full but to keep eating because the food is so good; Bantu’s mbuki-mvuki: whipping off your clothes to dance; and Waldeinsamkeit—that’s a German word for the mysterious, and possibly slightly creepy, solitude you may feel when you’re in the woods by yourself.

Early this morning, Lomas tweeted another such single word that covers a lot of meaning: Jayus. It’s Indonesian. And it means “a joke so unfunny (or told so badly) that you just have to laugh.” Why did he tweet that today? Check the calendar. And be filled with melancholy and world-weariness. You know. Weltschmertz.


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