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VOA慢速英语:词汇掌握:我想理解“gonna”的含义

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I Wanna Understand Gonna

我想理解“gonna”的含义

Today on Ask a Teacher, we answer a question from Valens in Rwanda.

今天在Ask a Teacher栏目里,我们回答了来自卢旺达的瓦伦斯的问题。

Question:

问题:

“Please explain how to use ‘gonna.’ ” – Valens, Rwanda

“请解释一下如何使用‘gonna’”—瓦伦斯,卢旺达。

Answer:

回答:

Dear Valens,

亲爱的瓦伦斯

You probably hear native English speakers on television and in movies using reduced forms of words all the time. Examples are the terms gonna, gotta, wanna, shoulda and oughta.

你可能在电视上和电影里听见母语为英语的人总是使用一些单词的简化形式。 这样的例子有gonna、gotta、wanna、shoulda和oughta等词语。

In spoken English, we often put words together. In the process, we also leave out some letters and the vowel sounds change a little. So the expression "going to" becomes "gonna."

在英语口语中,我们经常将单词放在一起。在这个过程中,我们也会漏掉一些字母,元音发音也会有所变化。所以短语“going to”就变成了“gonna”。

Reduced forms are informal speech

简化形式是非正式口语

Here are a few examples of reduced forms in formal and informal speech:

这里是几个在正式和非正式口语中的简化形式的例子:

Formal: What are you going to do tonight? Do you want to see a movie?

正式:今天你要做什么?你想去看电影吗?

Informal: Whatcha gonna do tonight? Wanna see a movie?

非正式:今天你要做什么?你想去看电影吗?

Formal: Sorry, but I've got to do my homework. You ought to do yours, too.

正式:不好意思,但是我要去做我的家庭作业。你也应该去做你自己的家庭作业。

Informal: Sorry, but I gotta do my homework. You oughta do yours, too.

非正式:不好意思,但是我要去做我的家庭作业。你也应该去做你自己的家庭作业。

Note that the informal examples are how many people normally speak. It would sound very formal and, as a result, strange to pronounce every sound of every word. This shortening of sounds happens in many languages.

请注意非正式例子是很多人经常会说到的。它听起来很正式,但是把每个单词的音都发出来结果感觉很奇怪。这种发音的简化形式在很多语言中都存在。

Use reduced forms in speech, not in writing

简化形式用在口语中,而非写作中

In English, you may not see the short forms in writing because writers are usually more careful to spell each word. But when a writer wants to show how a person is really speaking, these short forms can appear in books and, more commonly, in popular culture.

在英语中,你可能在写作中看不到缩写形式因为作家通常会在拼写单词时更加仔细。但是当一个作家想展示一个人的真实说话状态时,这些缩写形式会出现在书中,并且这在大众文化中更常见。

Compare these examples from popular movies. The first is the reduced form of "Get out of there!"

对比这些来自流行电影中的例子。 第一个例子是“Get out of there!”缩写形式。

1. (phone rings. Tom Cruise answers) Cruise: Hello. Voice: Get outta there! They know. Get out!

(电话响了。汤姆·克鲁斯接听)克鲁斯:哈喽。声音:离开这儿!他们知道了。快点儿离开!

2. Woman: Get outta there. 

女人:离开这儿!

3. Man: Don't talk to him. Get outta there!

男人:别与他交谈!离开这儿!

Here are examples of "It's going to blow."

这是“It's going to blow.”的一些例子。

1. Ironman: Got a nuke comin' in. It's gonna blow in less than a minute.

钢铁侠:有核武器进入。 不到一分钟就要爆炸了。

2. Boy: But wait, but the plane - it's gonna blow up, it's gonna blow up!

男孩:但是等一下,但是这飞机—它要爆炸了,它要爆炸了!

Sometimes, people have little time to tell others about their exact problem, so they use reduced form words. But people in everyday life also use reduced forms to seem friendly.

有时,人们几乎没时间告诉其他人他们确切的问题,所以他们使用简化形式的单词。但是在日常生活中的人们也用简化形式,这样使他们看起来更友善。

It's fine to use terms like these when you are speaking with friends. It's better not to use them in English class or a formal situation, like an office.

当你跟你的朋友说话时使用这些词语是很好的。 但是最好不要在课堂上或者办公室这样的正式场合使用。

Remember that you should not write the reduced forms, except in informal communication to friends or family.

记住,你书写时不能用简化形式,除了与你的朋友或者家人的非正式通信中。

That's Ask a Teacher for this week. So I've gotta get outta here.

这是这周Ask a Teacher栏目的所有内容。所以我该离开这儿了。

I’m Jill Robbins.

吉尔·罗宾斯为你报道。

I Wanna Understand Gonna

Today on Ask a Teacher, we answer a question from Valens in Rwanda.

Question:

“Please explain how to use ‘gonna.’ ” – Valens, Rwanda

Answer:

Dear Valens,

You probably hear native English speakers on television and in movies using reduced forms of words all the time. Examples are the terms gonna, gotta, wanna, shoulda and oughta.

In spoken English, we often put words together. In the process, we also leave out some letters and the vowel sounds change a little. So the expression "going to" becomes "gonna."

Reduced forms are informal speech

Here are a few examples of reduced forms in formal and informal speech:

Formal: What are you going to do tonight? Do you want to see a movie?

Informal: Whatcha gonna do tonight? Wanna see a movie?

Formal: Sorry, but I've got to do my homework. You ought to do yours, too.

Informal: Sorry, but I gotta do my homework. You oughta do yours, too.

Note that the informal examples are how many people normally speak. It would sound very formal and, as a result, strange to pronounce every sound of every word. This shortening of sounds happens in many languages.

Use reduced forms in speech, not in writing

In English, you may not see the short forms in writing because writers are usually more careful to spell each word. But when a writer wants to show how a person is really speaking, these short forms can appear in books and, more commonly, in popular culture.

Compare these examples from popular movies. The first is the reduced form of "Get out of there!"

1. (phone rings. Tom Cruise answers) Cruise: Hello. Voice: Get outta there! They know. Get out!

2. Woman: Get outta there. 

3. Man: Don't talk to him. Get outta there!

Here are examples of "It's going to blow."

1. Ironman: Got a nuke comin' in. It's gonna blow in less than a minute.

2. Boy: But wait, but the plane - it's gonna blow up, it's gonna blow up!

Sometimes, people have little time to tell others about their exact problem, so they use reduced form words. But people in everyday life also use reduced forms to seem friendly.

It's fine to use terms like these when you are speaking with friends. It's better not to use them in English class or a formal situation, like an office.

Remember that you should not write the reduced forms, except in informal communication to friends or family.

That's Ask a Teacher for this week. So I've gotta get outta here.

I’m Jill Robbins.

_____________________________________________________________

 

Words in This Story

vowel – n. a speech sound made with your mouth open and your tongue in the middle of your mouth not touching your teeth, lips, or other parts of the mouth

formal – adj. (of language) suitable for serious or official speech and writing

informal – adj. (of language) relaxed in tone or not suited for serious or official speech and writing

pronounce – v. to make the sound of (a word or letter) with your voice

spell – v. to say, write, or print the letters of (a word or name)

nuke - n. (informal) a nuclear weapon

blow – v. (informal) to explode; to damage or destroy (something) with an explosion


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