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科学美国人60秒: 啄木鸟鼓着自己的曲调

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Woodpeckers Drum to Their Own Tunes

啄木鸟鼓着自己的曲调

Humans can recognize each other by voice alone. I sound different from other 60-Second Science reporters, for example. In fact, lots of nonhuman animals, of all types, use voices to distinguish familiar individuals…including frogs, fish, lemurs, and penguins.

人类可以通过声音彼此识别。例如,我的声音与科学60秒的其他记者不同。事实上,各种非人类的动物,利用用声音来区分熟悉个体…例如青蛙、鱼、狐猴和企鹅等。

And that unique audio fingerprint extends to a sound you may have heard in the forest on occasion: ...the drumming of a woodpecker.

这种独特的声音指纹甚至可以延伸到你偶尔在森林中听到的声音:啄木鸟啄木的声音.

Researchers recorded multiple drum rolls, from 41 great spotted woodpeckers—colorful red, white and black birds—living in Polish forests. They then used audio software to analyze them.

研究人员记录了多个音频文件, 41种伟大的斑点啄木鸟——居住在波兰森林总的五彩斑斓的红色、白色以及黑色的啄木鸟。然后他们用音频软件对它们的声音进行分析。

And they found that the length of the drumrolls, and the spacing between beats varied enough from bird to bird to tell the woodpeckers apart by drumming alone. The study is in the journal PLOS ONE.

他们发现声音的长度和节拍之间的间不同的啄木鸟有很大的差异,以此来依靠啄木声来区分逐木鸟。这项研究发表在《公共科学图书馆·综合》期刊上。

The scientists say this fact might be useful to woodpeckers, in identifying each other. And to conservation biologists, trying to tease one bird from another in a recording, for example, to count individuals in a given area. The birds' head-banging could thus do away with that research headache.

科学家们表示这一事实对啄木鸟相互识别是有用的。对于保育生物学家来说,试着在记录中从区分不同的鸟类,例如,在某一特定区域内计算啄木鸟的数量。鸟类的头部撞击可能会使这项研究麻烦问题消失。

Woodpeckers Drum to Their Own Tunes

Humans can recognize each other by voice alone. I sound different from other 60-Second Science reporters, for example. In fact, lots of nonhuman animals, of all types, use voices to distinguish familiar individuals…including frogs, fish, lemurs, and penguins.

And that unique audio fingerprint extends to a sound you may have heard in the forest on occasion: ...the drumming of a woodpecker.

Researchers recorded multiple drum rolls, <> from 41 great spotted woodpeckers—colorful red, white and black birds—living in Polish forests. They then used audio software to analyze them.

And they found that the length of the drumrolls, and the spacing between beats varied enough from bird to bird to tell the woodpeckers apart by drumming alone. The study is in the journal PLOS ONE.

The scientists say this fact might be useful to woodpeckers, in identifying each other. And to conservation biologists, trying to tease one bird from another in a recording, for example, to count individuals in a given area. The birds' head-banging could thus do away with that research headache.


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